American Psycho Lands Broadway Home

first_img American Psycho Related Shows Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on June 5, 2016 View Comments Benjamin Walker We now know where Benjamin Walker will be making his killer moves in the eagerly anticipated American Psycho. Directed by Rupert Goold, the new musical is scheduled to begin previews later than previously announced, on March 26, 2016, instead of February 19, at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre. Opening night has not yet been set, although it will need to be before April 26 to make the production eligible for the 2016 Tony Awards. Further casting will be announced later.American Psycho features music and lyrics by Tony and Grammy winner Duncan Sheik and a book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Based on the novel by Bret Easton Ellis, the tuner follows 26-year-old Patrick Bateman (Walker): a sophisticated, rich and devastatingly handsome Wall Street banker in 1980s New York City. He’s got a sculpted body, a model-gorgeous girlfriend and a to-die-for apartment. There’s just one snag: Patrick can’t get the blood out of his $5000 suits, because he also has a murderous, psychopathic alter ego that he hides from his friends and co-workers. The novel was adopted into an acclaimed film in 2000 starring Christian Bale and Reese Witherspoon.The show premiered at London’s Almeida Theatre in December 2013 and had been set to make its U.S. premiere at Second Stage off-Broadway in February 2015.last_img read more

Angels lose another game and pitcher Felix Pena

first_img Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros In the second inning of a scoreless game, José Ramírez hit a bouncer to first baseman Albert Pujols and Peña was covering the bag. He reached up to grab Pujols’ underhand flip, which was a little high. Although Peña seemed to land awkwardly on his left ankle, he then grabbed his right knee.Peña grimaced in pain and then lay on the field for a few minutes as athletic trainer Adam Nevala worked on him. Nevala and Pujols carried Peña off the field, each with an arm on his back and under a knee.Peña had been the only pitcher who had remained a part of the Angels rotation throughout the entire season. He pitched the final seven innings of the Angels’ combined no-hitter on July 12.“He’s pitched pretty well for us,” Ausmus said. “We’re taking some hits in the starting rotation. We gotta find another way.”Trevor Cahill replaced Peña on the mound and held the Indians hitless until the fifth inning, when it all fell apart quickly.Cahill gave up a one-out double to Franmil Reyes and then a two-run homer to Jason Kipnis. He hit Kevin Plawecki with a pitch and then was removed in favor of Justin Anderson.Anderson gave up a single to Tyler Naquin and then a three-run homer to Francisco Lindor, putting the Angels in a 5-0 hole.The Angels managed only two runs, both driven in by Justin Upton. He had a sacrifice fly in the sixth and a broken-bat RBI single in the eighth.“I think we’re just kind of cool as a team offensively,” Ausmus said. “If we were swinging the bats better, it wouldn’t really matter as much who they were throwing at us. We’d probably be getting our hits and scoring more runs. We’re in kind of a lull offensively and have been for a little while.” PreviousLos Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani warms up before a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Trevor Cahill, right, turns away as Cleveland Indians’ Jason Kipnis, back left, rounds the bases after hitting a two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Felix Pena is carried off the field by teammate Albert Pujols and an unidentified trainer during the second inning of a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsCleveland Indians’ Kevin Plawecki (27) greets Francisco Lindor after Lindor’s three-run home run off Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Justin Anderson as Angels catcher Kevan Smith, right, looks away during a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Cleveland Indians’ Francisco Lindor, right, celebrates after hitting a three-run home run off Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Justin Anderson as Angels catcher Kevan Smith, left, watches during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout reacts after striking out against the Cleveland Indians during the second inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Trevor Cahill delivers to Cleveland Indians’ Jason Kipnis during the second inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. Cahill replaced starter Felix Pena after an injury. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Felix Pena, center, is tended to by trainers after an injury while covering first base during the second inning of a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Cleveland Indians starting pitcher Adam Plutko delivers to Los Angeles Angels’ David Fletcher during the first inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Felix Pena delivers to Cleveland Indians’ Francisco Lindor during the first inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Cleveland Indians starting pitcher Adam Plutko delivers to Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani during the first inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani hits a groundout off Cleveland Indians starting pitcher Adam Plutko during the first inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani takes a warmup swing before a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani watches batting practice before a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani warms up before a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani warms up before a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani warms up before a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Trevor Cahill, right, turns away as Cleveland Indians’ Jason Kipnis, back left, rounds the bases after hitting a two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)NextShow Caption1 of 16Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Trevor Cahill, right, turns away as Cleveland Indians’ Jason Kipnis, back left, rounds the bases after hitting a two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Cleveland, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Phil Long)ExpandCLEVELAND — Brad Ausmus sat in the dugout before the Angels’ game on Saturday night and talked about how they simply had to move beyond what had been a miserable week.Then it got a little worse.Félix Peña suffered a right knee sprain and had to be carried off the field in the second inning of the Angels’ 7-2 loss to the Cleveland Indians, their seventh loss in nine games.While the Angels awaited the results two MRI exams — Andrelton Simmons also was undergoing tests after hurting his foot during pregame work in the cage — the Angels’ manager was particularly concerned about Peña. Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield center_img Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone A couple hours after Ausmus uttered those words, Simmons was scratched from the lineup.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “I’m not overly optimistic based on his reaction,” Ausmus said after watching Peña writhe in pain on the field.While it seems likely that Peña will miss some time, the Angels are about to have prospect Patrick Sandoval make his big league debut on Monday. Andrew Heaney, who is out with a shoulder problem, also could be back as soon as next weekend.Before the Angels even took the field, Ausmus held a five-minute team meeting. Although Ausmus wouldn’t divulge the reason for the meeting or its substance, it follows a stretch in which they had lost six of their previous eight games.Asked in general for his thoughts on the team’s recent play, Ausmus said he’s satisfied with the effort, although not the results.“I think our players are very focused and they have been from Day 1,” he said. “They go about their business the right way. I have absolutely zero issue with the effort level or the caring. We just had a (bad) week. We gotta put the (bad) week behind us.”last_img read more

An Introduction to the Juggernaut Theory

first_imgKyle Porter here. I did not write this. I want to make that clear because I don’t want to take any credit for something that’s so well-researched and thought out. I simply have a blog that a lot folks read and this came to me from a guy named Justin Brownlee (who is a Kansas State fan) and I wanted to get it out there. It’s absolutely tremendous and well worth your time. It explains why teams named “Oklahoma State” and many others don’t get to play for national titles. I hope you enjoy it.What is the juggernaut theory?Within college athletics, there exists laws that define and control reality. Some of them are widely known, whether it’s the power of TV markets and cable contracts, or the recruiting hotbeds of Texas, Florida, and California and how a program’s success can be directly tied to their success recruiting out of these states.Other laws are not as visible, but they are just as strong, and the public greatly misunderstands them or largely misses how critical their existence is. The first law to focus on within college football is what I like to call the juggernaut theory.At first glance, every college football fan can acknowledge the juggernaut theory to a degree. Almost no one accurately attributes how much control and influence it actually has.Simply stated, the juggernaut theory is the idea that the dozen or so most powerful programs in college football have an extraordinary advantage in the landscape of modern college football. More specifically, these juggernauts have such an incredible advantage over non-juggernauts in getting to, and winning, national championships, that it is almost impossible to win a national championship as a non-juggernaut.Once understood, the juggernaut theory reveals the answers to why your favorite school regularly seems to make it to a major bowl game or occasionally the national championship itself, if you’re a fan of a juggernaut. And it will most definitely provide provide an answer to why your favorite team never makes a major bowl game outside of winning their conference, and never makes it to a national championship, if your alma mater is not a juggernaut.First, let’s make a distinction. I am labeling the following as juggernauts, USC, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Michigan, Nebraska, Texas, Oklahoma, LSU, Tennessee,[1.Nebraska and Tennessee are both interesting in the fact that both have allowed their programs to slip. In the case of Nebraska, it was inevitable at some point after the scholarship limit. Lincoln could not be further from the primary and secondary recruiting hotbeds. With Tennessee, there’s not a good excuse, they have just fallen.] Alabama, Florida, Florida State, and Miami. I think an argument can be made that Oregon has cracked into this group in a unique way, being the lone school without an extensively rich tradition of great football. They have muscled in the old-fashioned way, extraordinarily large amounts of money.I will make a quick note about one school that many of you may be wondering about, Auburn. I don’t really know what to do with Auburn. They have the tradition, the national championship, the major bowl games…my hesitation is solely because I don’t know anyone outside of Auburn, AL that doesn’t think they cheated in an obvious, egregious way for their national championship. I’m sorry, Auburn fans, I truly have no bone to pick with you, but it’s hard to know where to accurately place you in this list, but I’m throwing you in. More on that later.Second, I want to be very clear on this point. The entire theory is useful while examining the only period in college sports that means anything, the modern day. I will save my full defense of this point for another time and another theory, but I have to be clear. When viewing college athletics, it is paramount to largely ignore accomplishments prior to this time and focus exclusively on what has happened after.Take for example, the accomplishments of the great John Wooden. I love Coach Wooden and he will always be a treasure, but it’s unhelpful anytime someone compares his dynasty to anything in modern day sports. First, he competed during a time when maybe 10 schools in the entire country devoted significant amounts of time and money to their athletic programs. Today, there are upwards of 70 schools across the country devoted enormous amounts of time and resources to building exceptional athletic programs.[1.When I say 70+, that’s just college football. College basketball might be well over 150.]  Second, youth sports was largely non-existent 30+ years ago compared to today.My generation is the first that grew up with youth leagues, facilities, fitness programs, coaching, etc. all not just within five miles of wherever you lived, but also, for the first time, affordable for the majority of Americans. These first two realities created an entirely different modern day athletic environment-competition is not just greater than it used to be, it completely blows it out of the water. Competition today is the internet and competition prior to the modern era is the pony express. The final enormous difference are modern era cable contracts, forever moving college sports to the forefront of American life and culture.What is the “modern era”, then? It’s entirely debatable, and the exact year it started is not a hill I will die on, but I land somewhere in the mid 90’s. The Southeastern Conference was created in 1992, the superior Big 12 in 19963.[1.I married an Arkansas grad, this is literally the biggest fight in my marriage.] I generally will split the difference and use the creation and debut of “the deuce”, ESPN 2, in 1993.There’s no doubt that this time in American culture marked an enormous shift. Before this date, college sports were primarily something you read about in your local newspaper the day after. After this date, and in ever-increasing measure each year, college sports became something that you witnessed live, watched talking heads discuss all throughout the week, and could go every hour of the day watching some sort of coverage if you so desired.A brief history of juggernautsBack to subject at hand-as we examine the juggernauts and what they have accomplished during the modern era, it is staggering. Again, this is an idea that many people would agree on some level maybe exists, but almost no one acknowledges how much power it has over college football. Let’s look at the facts. Here are the national champions every year of the Modern Era.1993: Florida State1994: Nebraska1995: Nebraska1996: Florida1997: Nebraska[1. Any comparison of Alabama to mid 90’s Nebraska is a joke. Nebraska won championships the old fashioned way, by winning all of their games. For some reason, Alabama loses and we all think they’re actually more impressive than before their hiccup…]1998: Kansas State Tennessee.[1. I hate you, Bob Stoops. You too, Sirr Parker.]1999: Florida State2000: Oklahoma2001: Miami2002: Ohio State2003: USC and LSU2004: USC2005: Texas2006: Florida2007: LSU2008: Florida2009: Alabama2010: Auburn2011: Alabama2012: Alabama2013: Florida State2014: Ohio StateTo recap, juggernauts don’t just win most of the time. They literally win all of the time. What gets even more interesting is who they beat in each of these national championship games. Let’s take a look.1993: Nebraska1994: Miami1995: Florida1996: Florida State1997: Tennessee1998: Florida State1999: Virginia Tech[1. Here we have it-the only non-juggernaut to play for a national championship. Let that sink in. Out of FORTY EIGHT teams, only one non-juggernaut got the opportunity to line up and play for a championship.]2000: Florida State2001: Nebraska2002: Miami2003: Oklahoma2004: Oklahoma2005: USC2006: Ohio State2007: Ohio State2008: Oklahoma2009: Texas2010: Oregon2011: LSU2012: Notre Dame2013: Auburn2014: OregonThis is even more compelling, and much more significant, than the fact that juggernauts won every single national championship in the modern era (which you could argue means they won every national championship ever…). In over 20 years, not only have juggernauts dominated the national championship scene, they’ve had an iron grip on finishing 2nd. What does this mean? It’s not just extremely difficult to win a national championship, it’s extremely difficult to even get in the game for a chance to win a national championship.How we Got HereAs we look at why juggernauts have dominated the winning and losing sides of the championship game, we have to start with the fact that juggernauts have been given an enormous benefit of the doubt when it comes to the rankings that place them in the top two to begin with.Let’s just start with some of the more notable offenses.Auburn (2004)While I’ve stated that I don’t really know what to do with Auburn, and have placed them at the very back of the juggernaut list, 2004 showed the country that there is a pecking order. And when it comes to rankings, the top juggernauts will always be at the top of the pecking order.When you think about a team going undefeated and winning the SEC! SEC! SEC! and not being ranked No. 1,[1.Only because it’s impossible to rank them higher.] it’s pretty shocking given the outlandish SEC bias we live in today. That bias didn’t necessarily exist back in 2004. But the main premise is this: Auburn was never going to get the benefit of the doubt when compared with two pure juggernauts, USC and Oklahoma. OU actually ended up getting demolished in this game, and many Auburn fans were left to wonder what if.Oklahoma State (2011)Oh, 2011…you terrible, terrible year. Let’s start with the RIDICULOUS notion that any wrongdoing was swept away because Alabama won the game in such a convincing manner over LSU, so clearly they deserved to be there, end of story. I am AMAZED at how often this logic enters the picture anytime a team snuck in over another team and ends up winning it all (see Ohio State 2014).It’s like the whole country hasn’t even thought that maybe…just maybe…when you give Nick Saban or Urban Meyer six weeks to prepare for one (or two) game(s), they could beat anybody (!!!) even if it’s not their best team ever and they didn’t deserve to be there in the first place. Back to the matter at hand. In 2011 logic and sound thinking disappeared from humanity. Alabama, who did not win their conference, and who did not even win its division within its conference, was given so many brownie points for losing to LSU…at home…after a bye week…that the entire country largely ignored the rest of their resume.In 2011, Alabama only beat three teams that even made a bowl game, compared to Oklahoma State’s 7-8 wins over bowl teams. Yes, you read that correctly. Alabama was given the world based almost entirely on a close loss at home to LSU after a bye week. Let me rephrase it another way, Alabama was ranked over Oklahoma State for SOMETHING THEY COULD NOT DO!!!!But they couldn’t do it so impressively…their failure was so mesmerizing to the eye test, that this inability to do something placed them over a team with a far better resume. But let’s cut to the chase and be clear. Alabama got their rematch because Alabama is Alabama. Oklahoma State did not, because they are Oklahoma State.Baylor and TCU (2014)I will be brief on this one. One-loss Baylor and TCU were left to the dust for one loss teams Oregon, Ohio State, and Alabama. The Big 12 teams were largely downgraded for not having a championship game, this completely ignores the fact that Big 12 teams play everyone in their conference.When you list out the 14 teams in the SEC or Big 10, you begin to see that it’s very possible to play half of your schedule or more against nothing. In 2012, Georgia fans were screaming that they should have a spot in the title game if they beat Alabama in the SEC championship game (which they almost did). A quick look back to Georgia’s 2012 season reveals that their schedule was farcical. They literally played seven teams that any top 10 team in the country would be favored by more than 20 against.It’s so obvious it could go without saying, but if 2014 was Texas and OU instead of Baylor and TCU, and Arizona State and Minnesota instead of Oregon and Ohio State, no one would mention the lack of a title game. In fact, they would probably point out how amazing it is that the Big 12 somehow produced 2 teams that made it through such a brutal schedule with only one loss.This is the power of the juggernaut theory.The juggernaut theory does not stop with the national championship. It has held an enormous amount of power over who makes major bowl games (Orange Bowl, Sugar Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Rose Bowl-we’ll call them BCS games even though the BCS has not covered the entirety of the modern era). When you look at the four BCS bowl games, you have six guaranteed spots for conference winners. That leaves two at-large bids. This changed for the better in 2006 when the BCS separated its title game and created two additional at-large bids. When examining the the at large bids given out from 1993-2005, you find 25 schools that received the bids. 19 of them were juggernauts.Being a Kansas State alum, this was not news to me. While we were awarded one of the six at-large bids (KSU demolished Donovan McNabb’s Syracuse team in the 1997 Fiesta Bowl), the next 5 years were full of questions. Such outlandish questions that the 1999 season had a newly instated “Kansas State Rule” that declared any team finishing in the top four of the final BCS Standings would be awarded an automatic at-large bid, after the Cats’ unforeseen 4th quarter meltdown in the Big 12 championship saw their greatest chance at a national championship free-fall into the Alamo Bowl.The very next season was another at-large miss as another top five 11-1 K-State team fell to the Holiday Bowl. 2000 would yield another 11 win K-State team, this time resulting in the Cotton. After a 6-6 down year in 2001, the Cats were overlooked again in 2002, after winning 11 games playing one of the hardest schedules in the country. One of those 11 wins was a very convincing victory over Carson Palmer’s USC team, who happened to get the at-large nod over the Cats. Finally K-State returned to the Fiesta Bowl in 2003 after knocking off Oklahoma for the Big 12 championship.This is obviously a very well known part of the juggernaut theory. It’s not rocket science or news to anyone that traditional powers are going to picked over non-juggernauts. Yet this holds the secret as to why the juggernauts have a stranglehold on the national championship game.Why Juggernauts Always Get the NodThe first and most obvious reason juggernauts get the nod the enormous majority of the time is that people gravitate towards them. It’s human nature. You choose the known over the unknown, the longtime proven commodity over the upstart.The interesting part about the juggernaut theory today (College Football Playoff) compared with the BCS era is that the CFP might do the opposite of what everyone thought it would do. With the BCS, you at least had a portion of the rankings that were not subject to public opinion. With the CFP, it’s entirely based on the opinions of humans. Let’s look at the small sample size of results. 2014 yielded four juggernauts.There were two very qualified teams that just missed out (hint-they weren’t juggernauts). The early November rankings of 2015 were probably the most laughable of any. While Clemson, a non-juggernaut (albeit a Southeastern school with some tradition)[1. We should add here that Clemson is ranked #1 because of wins over juggernauts (Notre Dame and Florida State). If they would have beat a one loss Utah and a two loss Syracuse, they probably wouldn’t be there.] held down the top spot, the rest of the top four were juggernauts. The most glaring aspect of the three juggernauts is that two of them are ranked in the top 4 with a loss, while several non-juggernauts sit outside of the top four with no losses!Here’s why this happens every single year in college football. College football is the only major sport in America where the layout of teams is so fractured, we really cannot get a completely accurate picture of who the best teams definitely are. There are only 3-4 non-conference games, majority of which are puff opponents.Compare this to college basketball where non-conference play and the tournament give us a fairly reasonable picture of which teams and conferences were actually the strongest. All of the professional sports play enough games that fracturing doesn’t happen, we can again see who the best teams are. With college football, it’s a total toss-up. Take last year for example, there’s still a very active disease assumption in America that the SEC is significantly better than the rest of the country.There was also a strong belief that the Big 10 was slow and wouldn’t come within 3 touchdowns of Alabama. While both assumptions may have been perfectly accurate a few years before, the distinct separation of conferences kept that thought alive.Here is the stark truth: it is not possible to know exactly how much value to place on each conference in any given year. This makes it extremely difficult to pick just 2-4 teams to play in the national championship.In addition to literally having no way to discern exactly how teams and conferences stack up to each other, college football is littered every year with teams having the exact same record. Let me tell you a secret about college football. It’s ******* hard to go undefeated. It’s ridiculously hard. Did I mention that there are, at the very least, 70 programs across the country that all unleash enormous amounts of time and money to building great programs?Or the millions of 18 year olds that, for their entire life, have taken advantage of facilities, coaches, and opportunities that did not exist to 18 year olds 30 years ago? For a coach to get 18-22 year old kids to play at such a consistently high level 14 times a year is absurd. What am I getting at? It was absolutely not a guarantee that the college football season would yield two, and only two, undefeated teams each and every year. And it’s even less of a guarantee that such a thing would happen to four teams in the CFP.What this means is that several BCS decisions were made between teams with the exact same record. Without an accurate way to tell which team is more deserving, America resorted to picking the juggernaut, every single time.[1. …but then giving justification for it that sometimes sounded as ridiculous as Alabama looking really really good trying to do something they couldn’t do.]The answer is making the playoff extend another week and adding four more teams. Having four teams with five major conferences is nonsensical, and assuming only conference champions deserve to go is also wrong. With eight teams, juggernauts will still get picked a lot. But with eight, the playoff is ensuring that almost without fail, the best team in the country got a chance to play for a national championship. Last year, Ohio State was a deserving champion, but a perfectly reasonable case can be made that TCU was the best team in the country. With eight, this doesn’t happen.[1. Quick disclaimer — I don’t think juggernauts getting picked is necessarily bad all of the time. I am not saying that Oklahoma State definitely deserved to play LSU over Alabama (or Auburn USC or TCU/Baylor). It’s very possible the Big 12 provided tons of bowl teams for OkState to play that were all good, not great. I’m simply pointing out that college football has, and will, produce pretty even resumes and the juggernaut will get the nod almost every time.]If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

Dr. Jaja Calls for Shift Towards Service Excellence

first_img Chairman of the Jamaica Customer Service Association (JaCSA), Dr. Nsombi Jaja, is calling for a shift towards service excellence locally.She said that quality customer service is a critical component, which impacts every element of business.“Let us… create a tectonic shift in our mindset, attitudes and in our focus on customer service and service excellence. We have the power; let’s use the power to transform the landscape of service excellence in this country. Let us work together and support the initiatives that will move the needle in the right direction,” she added.Dr. Jaja was speaking at the media launch of National Customer Service Week (NCSW) and the Service Excellence Conference at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston on Tuesday (September 4).The week will be observed from September 30 to October 6 under the theme ‘Be the Magic: The Making of Memorable Customer Experiences’ and will bring focus to the transformation that quality customer service can bring to the nation.The JaCSA Chairman urged that the week be used to shine the spotlight on the thousands of people who are delivering service excellence every day.“There is a principle of life that says ‘pay attention to what you want more of’, so if you want bad customer service, continue to showcase those, and if you want great customer service, showcase those because every day there is excellent customer service,” she said.Deputy Chairman, JaCSA, Richard Rowe, in his address, encouraged organisations, during NCSW, to raise awareness about the importance of customer service, boost morale and teamwork, and acknowledge and reward the work of staff.The week of activities will begin with a church service at the Webster Memorial Church on Half-Way Tree Road and includes workshops, school tours and competitions.The highlight of the week will be the Service Excellence Conference at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel on September 24 and 25, which will include presentations from Minister of Finance and the Public Service, Dr. the Hon. Nigel Clarke; and international customer experience coach John Formica.During the media launch, Victoria Mutual Building Society (VMBS), Massy Gas Products Limited, and Sarifa Insurance Brokers Limited were branded 2018 NCSW Ambassadors, having recently copped the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) and JaCSA Service Excellence Awards.The Jamaica Customer Service Song Competition organised by the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC) was also launched.The competition is open to primary and secondary school students. The winner will receive an $80,000 cash prize, trophies, among other things, and will be announced during the conference opening.For more information, contact JaCSA at 876-978-8668 or [email protected] “Let us… create a tectonic shift in our mindset, attitudes and in our focus on customer service and service excellence. We have the power; let’s use the power to transform the landscape of service excellence in this country. Let us work together and support the initiatives that will move the needle in the right direction,” she added. Chairman of the Jamaica Customer Service Association (JaCSA), Dr. Nsombi Jaja, is calling for a shift towards service excellence locally. She said that quality customer service is a critical component, which impacts every element of business. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Security Forces Going After Gang Leaders – Spencer

first_imgStory Highlights Minister of State in the Ministry of National Security, Hon. Rudyard Spencer, says the Government is taking the formation and participation in gangs very seriously and the security forces will be going after gang leaders and apprehending them. Minister of State in the Ministry of National Security, Hon. Rudyard Spencer, says the Government is taking the formation and participation in gangs very seriously and the security forces will be going after gang leaders and apprehending them.“We will be diminishing their status as heroes within the communities; they will face the full force of the law. Their assets will be seized and any assets [that] they have placed in the names of family members will also be seized. We will ensure that those who align themselves with organised criminal groups will be punished and will be relentlessly pursued,” he said.Mr. Spencer was speaking at the opening ceremony for the ‘Chance, Choice, Change (Triple C)’ Day Camp on Wednesday (September 19) at the Caymanas Golf and Country Club, St. Catherine.The Criminal Justice (Suppression of Criminal Organisations) Act, popularly called the ‘anti-gang’ law, is being reviewed to provide clarity about how a gang will be declared and special measures in court proceedings to protect witnesses.The law makes provision for the disruption and suppression of criminal organisations, outlines offences in order to restore a sense of security in the Jamaican society and strengthen the capacity of law-enforcement agencies to deal with crime more effectively.The Triple C Day Camp formed part of activities for Anti- Gang Week 2018 being observed from September 16 to 21 under the theme: ‘Gang Life equals no Life.’More than 50 students who are in conflict with the law and are on probation, attended the one-day camp, which featured special presentations by members of the Counter-Terrorism and Organised Crime (C-TOC) Branch of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) and representatives from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).The intervention was organised by C-TOC in collaboration with the Safety and Security Unit of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information and the Department of Correctional Services (DCS).A 2017 study undertaken by the Ministry of National Security reported that there are 274 gangs operating in Jamaica with some 9,000 members. Seventy-seven of these gangs are considered major organised criminal enterprises.The report also stated that there are growing numbers of children within schools who are involved in or associated with gangs.center_img “We will be diminishing their status as heroes within the communities; they will face the full force of the law. Their assets will be seized and any assets [that] they have placed in the names of family members will also be seized. We will ensure that those who align themselves with organised criminal groups will be punished and will be relentlessly pursued,” he said.last_img read more